Nat Bartsch playing the piano with her young child in her lap

The piece is intended to capture the butterflies that such women must have felt as they embarked on their journey; travelling to the other end of the earth, facing many unknowns, carrying a sense of purpose, responsibility and, perhaps, naiveté about what lay ahead.

NAT BARTSCH
AUSTRALIAN COMPOSER

Nat Bartsch is a multi-award-winning pianist and composer based in Melbourne, Australia. Her soothing, lyrical music explores the space between neoclassical, chamber music, jazz and children’s genres. She is most well-known for her lullabies, played across the world by people of all ages. This music was first released as Forever, and No Time At All (2018) followed by her ARIA-nominated jazz-reinterpretation Forever More (2020). This music supports people from all walks of life, from the birthing suite to the final hours of life.

In 2021, Nat released her critically acclaimed, neo-romantic album, Hope, for piano, string quartet and electronics. The album captures her experience of the Black Summer bushfires and COVID-19 lockdowns. Nat enjoys ongoing collaboration with her friend and fellow pianist Luke Howard, who co-produced Hope and previous neoclassical releases.

Nat has released several jazz trio recordings, and toured to Japan, Europe and across Australia. Commissions include PLEXUS, Solstice Trio, Muses Trios, Matt Withers and Sally Whitwell. Nat has been awarded the Melbourne Prize for Music (Development Award), the Johnny Dennis Music Award, the Catherine Mary Sullivan composing scholarship, and the Classical:NEXT AMC/APRA fellowship.

Nat is currently studying a Master of Composition at the Melbourne Conservatorium with Stuart Greenbaum.

Photo: Brett Scapin

PROGRAM NOTE

Nat Bartsch
Into the Light (2015)
For violin, clarinet and piano
PLEXUS commission

Into the Light is a composition dedicated to all women who served in World War One.

Within the horrors of war was the opportunity for many women to become something other than a mother or housewife, if only for a short time. The piece is intended
to capture the butterflies that such women must have felt as they embarked on their journey; travelling to the other end of the earth, facing many unknowns, carrying a sense of purpose, responsibility and, perhaps, naiveté about what lay ahead.

These women, such as nurse Rachel Pratt, were stepping into the light of a world much bigger than they had imagined; albeit for tragic reasons.

© Nat Bartsch

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